Category: Entertainment

From Seinfeld to Bieber: How to Engage the Right Celebrity for Your Business?

Celebrity involvement with Celebrities (1)brands and commercial enterprises has become so commonplace that there’s even a buzzword for it: “star-ups.”

From Jay Z and Tidal to Jessica Alba and The Honest Company (not to mention Ashton Kutcher and, well, just about everything!), celebrities love working with companies they resonate with.

But that doesn’t mean getting a celebrity on board is easy. Struggling startups, for example, may not be ready. Even well-funded, established companies should have a meaningful reason to partner with celebrities and be able to offer sufficient cash, equity, or something else that’s meaningful and incentivizes them to want to participate. …

How to Harness Power Like a Celebrity

In the mid-1990s, Apple ran a series of insightful ads entitled “Power Is,” featuring several celebrities describing what power meant to them.

Spike Lee said power is succeeding when the odds are against you and you have a constant desire to learn. George Clinton, on the other hand, shared that power is the ability to motivate, communicate, and reinvent yourself. Marlee Matlin described power as having confidence, no limits, and the freedom of expression.

#911 KELLI 2Simply by their celebrity status, all these people have a certain amount of power–a power to live how they want, influence others’ perspectives, and motivate people to take action. Of course, this power has its downside. How would you like your every move publicly dissected? But if celebrities treat that reality with respect and use it to uplift, inspire, and encourage others, then they can make a real difference–as well as a profit from their brand and their reach.

The question is: How do everyday people–specifically entrepreneurs–obtain this power?

While there is such a thing as “overnight success,” most celebrities work hard over a long period of time to reach their powerful status. Here are three strategies of the stars that business professionals can use to make a difference in the world and do things that truly matter to them:

1. Build Your Tribe

Who you align yourself with affects your values, reputation, success, and often your financial well-being. Most success stories involve individuals surrounded by people they trust who share their values and genuinely have their best interests at heart.

Take Oprah Winfrey, for example. She has had consistent support from incredibly loyal staff, close friends, and colleagues who have stood by her for decades. Personally, she’s benefitted tremendously from the mentor relationship she enjoyed with the late Dr. Maya Angelou, as well as from her long-time partner, Stedman Graham, and her best friend, Gayle King.

Jimmy Iovine and Dr. Dre’s business partnership with Beats is another great example of a professional relationship that was mutually beneficial. Beats proved to be highly profitable for both of them in its recent sale to Apple–something that may have been more challenging to do if not for the power of their partnership.

2. Pursue New Ventures

If you’ve had success as an entrepreneur once, you already know how to make something from nothing. Now, you have the ability to take your experience, resources, and prominence to create new businesses that fulfill a lifelong dream or generate revenue streams for a cause–or both.

Actor Paul Newman founded Newman’s Own in 1982 with pal A.E. Hotchner after his homemade salad dressing became a hit with friends. The company’s offerings have expanded, but always with the purpose of donating all proceeds to charities. To date, the amount contributed has surpassed $300 million.

Among other entrepreneurial endeavors, Sandra Bullock opened the eco-friendly Austin, Tex.-based Bess Bistro. She must love this pursuit because she was involved in every detail of making it come together.

3. Explore Other Interests

If you look at most celebrities’ rsums, you’ll notice a large number of multihyphenates–people with multiple job titles. It’s rare to truly excel in a number of areas, but many talented people who work hard can do it. Don’t feel like you have to stay in one industry or skill set. Branching out can often create multiple sources of income and fulfillment.

Take Beyonce Knowles, for example. She doesn’t stop with music–she’s built a business empire endorsing companies like H&M, creating a line of fragrances, and heading up a successful clothing company. It’s no wonder she topped the Forbes Celebrity 100 list.

You should also use a variety of tactics to engage with your audience via social networking. It’s what Hillary Clinton calls “smart power” (i.e., finding ways to connect with people so they can then influence their governments). While Clinton’s celebrity status often distracts from her work, she’s excellent at using her power to engage and empower youth, women, and entrepreneurs as she works toward change.

You may not be a “celebrity” to the general public, but if you’re successful in your field, there are likely a number of people who know who you are. As your recognition grows, the number of people you influence will increase. In all of these cases, the celebs referenced have used their power and influence to make a difference in a way that allows them to invest their heart, soul, energy, passion, time, and even money into something they love. That’s real power.

What will you do with your power?

This article was previously published in Inc.com

To your best success,

Kelli Richards, CEO of the All Access Group, LLC

PS: Subscribe to my FREE All Access Group Newsletter https://bit.ly/AAGNewletter

PSS: Listen to an entire library of intimate discussions with industry visionaries https://bit.ly/AllAccessPodcastSeries (Priceless)

 

 

 

4 Things You Can Do to Personalize Your Brand Like the Celebs

“This article was originally posted in the Huff Post Business”

Between Google and social media, it’s become simultaneously easier and more difficult than ever to maintain your brand image. With a few keystrokes, anyone can learn just about anything about you. On the other hand, if you can cultivate what your audience will find, you can influence your brand image and how others perceive you.

Screen Shot 2014-12-10 at 10.33.53 AMWhether you’re seeking a career change, a promotion, or new clients, this is a powerful tool, and perhaps no one knows this better than A-list celebrities.

Control Your Image Like a Pro

The most successful celebrities know that getting their name out there is about more than just being seen. It’s about imparting a personalized concept of who they are.
If you want to brand yourself like the stars, focus on these four tactics:

  1. Use media to your advantage. Whether that means effectively utilizing social media, public speaking, or establishing your brand’s platform by publishing articles and books, you need to become known and trusted as a thought leader. Leverage media to give people a sense of who you are, what you stand for, and what you’re doing to change the world. Don’t be a best-kept secret!
  2. Be authentic. Celebrities who express their fears and vulnerabilities honestly are more likely to create tighter bonds with their audiences. Think of when Princess Diana expressed her sadness over her crumbling marriage on global television or how Roger Ebert continued his work while visibly battling a crippling disease. When celebrities show they’re human, they’re much more relatable.
  3. Craft the image you want others to perceive about you. By consistently sharing your thoughts and message, you have more influence over what others think of you than you realize. Decide how you want to be perceived, then maintain a consistent tone and presence in your marketplace.
  4. Take a stand. Think of Matt Damon’s clean water advocacy or Angelina Jolie’s involvement with the U.N. Nearly all celebrities have causes they’re committed to, and their public advocacy galvanizes others to take action. By taking a position on something that matters to you, you extend your brand and image leaps and bounds in showing people who you are, what you stand for, and what you’re committed to.

Build Your Team

As a business professional, you have a lot on your plate, so how do you find the time and focus to accomplish all this? The trick is building a support system. Depending on your goals, include any (or all) of the following people on your team:

  • Social media strategist/publicist: This is someone with whom you can discuss how you want to be presented and who will help co-create your brand. She’ll provide feedback and develop strategies for shaping your image online and off.
  • Trusted advisor/mentor: Connect with someone who can help you identify your authentic self to ensure you’re living in alignment with your values. Ideally, this is someone who’s walked in your shoes. This will help you remain consistent, authentic, inspiring, and powerful when expressing yourself.
  • Visual artists: Whether this means photographers, videographers, or graphics and web designers, it’s important to include people who are skilled at crafting a digital persona that’s consistent with what you want to project to the world about you and your contributions.
  • Personal stylist/image consultant: It’s helpful to hire someone who can pay attention to your physical persona to ensure it highlights your best attributes in professional and social contexts.
  • Colleagues, friends, and family: Never forget the people who know you best. They’re your
  • cheerleaders and evangelists — always on hand for support and reinforcement.

With the right support team and tactics, you’ll be equipped with everything you need to blur the lines between business professional and business celebrity. Consider Richard Branson. Between his commitment to espousing pro-employee ethics, his authenticity, and his carefully crafted brand image, he’s known and lauded as much more than a successful businessman. He’s someone we admire as a thought leader and values-driven global ambassador who lives his passion and gives back to others.
In a world where brand, image, and reputation are key professional attributes, it’s critical for any professional to manage how she appears — whether that’s online or off. So get to work building your image and sharing your ideas. A whole new level of success awaits.

A highly sought-after consultant, super connector, trusted advisor, celebrity wrangler, and thought leader, Kelli Richards is the CEO of The All Access Group. She facilitates strategic business opportunities in digital distribution among innovative technology companies, talent and media companies, and brands to foster new revenue streams and deliver compelling consumer experiences. As a trusted advisor, she transforms the quality of people’s lives. Kelli is also the author of the bestselling e-book “The Magic and Moxie of Apple: An Insider’s View.”

Until next time,

 

Kelli Richards, CEO of The All Access Group.

The right mentor will also have the right CONNECTIONS to move any effort forward.  Be sure to ask who they think they can bring to the table around advisorship, possible collaboration and even funding.

How to Harness Power Like a Celebrity.

Three strategies of the stars that business professionals can use to make a difference in the world and do things that truly matter to them.

In the mid-1990s, Apple ran a series of insightful ads entitled “Power Is,” featuring several celebrities describing what power meant to them.

Spike Lee said power is succeeding when the odds are against you and you have a constant desire to learn. George Clinton, on the other hand, shared that power is the ability to motivate, communicate, and reinvent you. Marlee Matlin described power as having confidence, no limits, and the freedom of expression.

Simply by their celebrity status, all these people have a certain amount of power–a power to live how they want, influence others’ perspectives, and motivate people to take action. Of course, this power has its downside. How would you like your every move publicly dissected? But if celebrities treat that reality with respect and use it to uplift, inspire, and encourage others, then they can make a real difference–as well as a profit from their brand and their reach.

The question is: How do everyday people–specifically entrepreneurs–obtain this power?

While there is such a thing as “overnight success,” most celebrities work hard over a long period of time to reach their powerful status. Here are three strategies of the stars that business professionals can use to make a difference in the world and do things that truly matter to them:

1. Build Your Tribe

Who you align yourself with affects your values, reputation, success, and often your financial well-being. Most success stories involve individuals surrounded by people they trust who share their values and genuinely have their best interests at heart.

Take Oprah Winfrey, for example. She has had consistent support from incredibly loyal staff, close friends, and colleagues who have stood by her for decades. Personally, she’s benefitted tremendously from the mentor relationship she enjoyed with the late Dr. Maya Angelou, as well as from her long-time partner, Stedman Graham, and her best friend, Gayle King.

Jimmy Iovine and Dr. Dre’s business partnership with Beats is another great example of a professional relationship that was mutually beneficial. Beats proved to be highly profitable for both of them in its recent sale to Apple–something that may have been more challenging to do if not for the power of their partnership.

2. Pursue New Ventures 

If you’ve had success as an entrepreneur once, you already know how to make something from nothing. Now, you have the ability to take your experience, resources, and prominence to create new businesses that fulfill a lifelong dream or generate revenue streams for a cause–or both.

Actor Paul Newman founded Newman’s Own in 1982 with pal A.E. Hotchner after his homemade salad dressing became a hit with friends. The company’s offerings have expanded, but always with the purpose of donating all proceeds to charities. To date, the amount contributed has surpassed $300 million.

Among other entrepreneurial endeavors, Sandra Bullock opened the eco-friendly Austin, Tex.-based Bess Bistro. She must love this pursuit because she was involved in every detail of making it come together. 

3. Explore Other Interests

If you look at most celebrities’ resumes, you’ll notice a large number of multihyphenates–people with multiple job titles. It’s rare to truly excel in a number of areas, but many talented people who work hard can do it. Don’t feel like you have to stay in one industry or skill set. Branching out can often create multiple sources of income and fulfillment.

Take Beyoncé Knowles, for example. She doesn’t stop with music–she’s built a business empire endorsing companies like H&M, creating a line of fragrances, and heading up a successful clothing company. It’s no wonder she topped the Forbes Celebrity 100 list.

You should also use a variety of tactics to engage with your audience via social networking. It’s what Hillary Clinton calls “smart power” (i.e., finding ways to connect with people so they can then influence their governments). While Clinton’s celebrity status often distracts from her work, she’s excellent at using her power to engage and empower youth, women, and entrepreneurs as she works toward change.

You may not be a “celebrity” to the general public, but if you’re successful in your field, there are likely a number of people who know who you are. As your recognition grows, the number of people you influence will increase. In all of these cases, the celebs referenced have used their power and influence to make a difference in a way that allows them to invest their heart, soul, energy, passion, time, and even money into something they love. That’s real power.

What will you do with your power?

Until next time,

Kelli Richards, CEO of The All Access Group.

PS: Subscribe to my FREE All Access Group Newsletter https://bit.ly/AAGNewletter

 

The right mentor will also have the right CONNECTIONS to move any effort forward.  Be sure to ask who they think they can bring to the table around advisorship, possible collaboration and even funding.

 

 

Star-Struck: Tapping into the Power of a Celebrity Speaker

ID-100261899Creating a well-designed event is a balancing act. Tapping industry leaders and controversial renegades, orchestrating brilliant panels, and throwing awesome after-parties all help draw people in, but a well-informed celebrity speaker can elevate your event to “can’t-miss” status with real punch and energy.

A well-chosen, well-prepared celebrity speaker can infuse your event’s atmosphere with a sense of excitement. And a celebrity who’s informed, articulate, inspiring, and entertaining guarantees an unforgettable impression.

Choosing the Right Fit

Looking to engage a celebrity for your event? Rule one: don’t get star-struck.

Just because you can score a celebrity speaker — or you’re a big fan personally — doesn’t mean that person is right for your event. In fact, you should consider celebrity speakers exactly the way you’d consider any other kind of speaker: Do their presence, skill set, and expertise fit? And, more importantly, are they relevant to your audience?

By hiring someone who’s the wrong fit, you’re courting disaster. Accidentally offensive jokes, mismatched humor, or a lack of industry knowledge could easily backfire. There’s also simply the awkwardness of a brand clash. You wouldn’t hire Kid Rock to speak at a Lexus engagement, right?

Poor celebrity partnerships can also damage both your company’s and the speaker’s reputation. Paula Deen spoke on behalf of the diabetes medication Victoza, even though she was still cooking incredibly high-fat foods on her television show. The media went haywire with a barrage of negative press aimed at both parties.

Before hiring a speaker, check out your celebrity’s reputation, experience, and expertise — and trust your own instincts. Do your homework. Does it feel right? Find a fit that’s authentic, seamless, and comfortable for both the speaker and your audience.

How Much Is Too Much to Pay?

Beyond finding the perfect fit, there’s another facet to consider when hiring a celebrity speaker: Star power comes with a price. A celebrity’s speaking fee is based on popularity and demand, and those rates can range from four to seven figures, depending on the celebrity and what he or she is being asked to do (e.g., speaking versus performing).

You shouldn’t sacrifice the quality of your event to book a single A-list act. So what is a reasonable amount of money to drop on speaking fees? It depends on your budget, your audience, and your brand.

Apple’s iTunes Festival featured big names like Lady Gaga, Justin Timberlake, Katy Perry, and Elton John. How did Apple justify 30 days of A-list entertainers when they gave away the event tickets for free? Twenty million people registered to attend the live stream, which meant Apple had the opportunity to get its brand in front of a crowd roughly the size of Beijing. That’s the kind of exposure money can’t buy.

Creating a Lasting Impression

Often, this decision boils down to one simple question: Is it worth it? You have to keep in mind the goals of your event, understand your audience’s needs, and recognize what will truly “wow” them. You might not get a hard-and-fast financial return to cover this investment, but you’re paying to create a powerful and memorable experience, and that’s hard to quantify.

Good celebrity speakers inspire action, instill confidence, and invigorate your audience. And, most importantly, they help shape events that attendees will remember. With the right celebrity partnership, you’ll create an impression that lasts for years to come.

Creating a memorable experience pays off for you, your event, your product, and your celebrity speaker. By identifying a great-fitting match and paying an amount that will still pay you dividends, your company can host an event that becomes “can’t-miss” — and is talked about for years to come. That’s the kind of ROI you can’t pay for.

Until next time,

 

Kelli Richards, CEO of The All Access Group.

PS: Subscribe to my FREE All Access Group Newsletter https://bit.ly/AAGNewletter

 

The right mentor will also have the right CONNECTIONS to move any effort forward.  Be sure to ask who they think they can bring to the table around advisorship, possible collaboration and even funding.

 

 

 

Personal Glimpses of a Comet: Comic Genius Robin Williams

Screen Shot 2014-08-23 at 4.05.07 PMSometimes there are people who touch our lives in brief glimpses – and those encounters are so magical that we hold onto them and look forward to the next one over and over.  They’re friends of friends or colleagues we bump into at events or meetings or random connections where it seems serendipity is at work.

Robin Williams was one of those people for me. I was the talent producer of the BAMMIES (Awards) in San Francisco for nearly 20 years, and was fortunate to have the chance to work with Robin as a presenter a couple of times during my tenure.  Each time without fail, as tensions ran high in production (which they do at live events, no matter how well prepared you are), Robin would be there, working his magic backstage, making everyone laugh and lightening things up for us – as well as for the other presenters and performers.

And our paths would cross that way for many years through different circumstances.  When he was shooting, “What Dreams May Come,” I’d hear regular stories of his antics from my good friends Michael Van Himbergen and Jeff Diamond, who were part of the visual effects team. (The film won numerous awards for visual effects by the way, including an Oscar.)

And the connections continued.  As recently as last year, I was approached by Robin’s team to lend my “super-connector” expertise to help source potential buyers for his home in Napa from within my network.  Unfortunately we weren’t successful, but the home is a real stunner.

There have been other modest and even indirect glimpses of Robin too – someone recently showed me where Thomas Kincaid, the artist, had painted Robin into a corner of one of his San Francisco paintings; something few would notice or realize was him if no one pointed it out.  He was everywhere it seems.  But again, these are only flashes… the off-stage Robin was probably known only to a handful of very close friends, to his children… for the rest of us, it’s like how a comet flies past us through space.  Like Robin’s work, a fast-moving comet leaves trails everywhere in its wake, timeless.  Nothing really ever fades away completely, does it?

The point I’m making here,ultimately, is to pay attention.  To be sure that we stop and notice the people who whiz past us with comet-like brilliance.  To recognize how much they mean to us, even in brief glimpses.  And to BE that comet whenever we have that opportunity.  In the immortal words of Robin, “You’re only given one little spark of madness. You mustn’t lose it.”

Here’s to Robin … and the rest of his magical journey.

 

Kelli

PS:  Please read my LinkedIn article on Robin Williams here:  https://bit.ly/OnlyTheGoodDieYoung

 

 

Only the Good Die Young: Robin Williams & Other Creative Geniuses Taken Too Soon.

My Tribute published on LinkedIn

Robin Williams

I’ll never forget the first time I met Robin Williams. I was a teenager attending a taping of “Mork & Mindy” on the Paramount Pictures lot. He was incredibly gracious and encouraging to my 16-year-old self with aspirations of working in the entertainment business and making my dent in the universe.

Many years later, I crossed paths with him again when I was driving entertainment initiatives at Apple. He accepted our invitation to participate in a few marketing campaigns, and he even performed for our employees. He was always a delight to work with — no exceptions.

In 2003, Williams supported a fundraiser I helped organize. Through the Chairs That Care initiative, we asked celebrities to design a dining room chair that would be raffled off to support the Habitot Children’s Museum. Appropriately, Williams and his kids designed a chair entitled “Peace.”……….

 

Read the full article published in LinkedIn: https://bit.ly/KRRWTribute

 

And if we’re lucky, we will inspire and change the lives of those we reach, or at least make their days a little brighter along the way. I’m so grateful that we got to experience Williams’ magic and gifts; they touched many of us deeply. Honestly, it feels like losing a dear friend.

 

Until next time,

 

Kelli Richards is the CEO of The All Access Group.  A highly sought-after consultant, mentor, speaker, producer, coach, and author, 

 

I facilitate strategic business opportunities in digital distribution between technology companies, established artists and celebrities, film studios, record labels, and consumer brand companies in order to foster new revenue streams and deliver compelling consumer experiences. I’m also the author of the bestselling e-book, “The Magic & Moxie of Apple – An Insider’s View.”

 

 

Annual Allen & Company Sun Valley Conference

Every year since 1983, government officials, media moguls, journalists and technology buffs gather in Sun Valley for the Allen & Company Conference. This year was no difference, boasting names such as Zuckerberg, Buffett, Cook, Gates, Murdoch and Weinstein.

“Allen & Company is a private investment firm formed in 1922, located in New York and London. Allen & Company has advised, helped found and/or invested in numerous companies including BET, InterActiveCorp, Oxygen Media, Discovery Communications, News Corporation, the Coca-Cola Corporation and Google.”

The Allen & Company conference mixes thought-provoking presentations and a laid back mingling for industry leaders to foster relationships. CNBC dubbed the conference the “summer camp for moguls.”

The conference isn’t only fun for moguls though; local businesses thrive from the influx of people the conference brings each year. Sun Valley is known to attract many celebrities, but the Allen & Company Conference brings them in hundreds.

According to an article on MagicValley.com, the highlight of the afternoon was Tim Cook’s presence. Journalists spotted the Apple CEO buying a drink from a vending machine.

Meg Mazzocchi, a local working at The Toy Store was quoted in the MagicValley.com article saying, “You don’t ogle and you don’t intrude and you don’t ask for autographs,” she said. “Just let them enjoy their vacation. I think that’s why Sun Valley is popular.“

For more information about the conference, check out this article on MagicValley.com https://bit.ly/IgDde4

Until next time,

Kelli Richards, President, CEO of the All Access Group, LLC

PS: Subscribe to my FREE All Access Group Newsletter https://bit.ly/AAGNewletter

PSS: Listen to an entire library of intimate discussions with industry visionaries https://bit.ly/AllAccessPodcastSeries  (Priceless)

 

Dear HBO, Please Keep ‘Silicon Valley’ Real!!!

Startup life is a hot topic in Hollywood right now. From Joshua Michael Stern’s “Jobs” to the Amazon original series “Betas” there’s an undeniable appeal to life in Silicon Valley for those both inside and outside the startup bubble.

Of course, Hollywood is famous for exaggerating or overlooking important aspects of reality for entertainment purposes, but so far, HBO’s “Silicon Valley” looks promising. Despite the dramatic plotline and startup stereotypes, the show provides a mostly accurate portrayal of entrepreneurial life and may even help demystify some aspects of startup culture.

ID-10014351Can ‘Silicon Valley’ Avoid Hollywood Startup Myths?

“Silicon Valley” follows the lives of near-genius, socially awkward computer programmer Richard Hendrix (played by Thomas Middleditch) and his friends as he attempts to launch his company in the star-studded world of Silicon Valley.

The show was inspired by the real-life experiences of director Mike Judge, who was a Silicon Valley engineer in the ’80s. Living up to his “Office Space” brilliance, Judge carries the mindset of the tech community to the small screen and introduces a number of well-cast (if stereotypical) characters we can all relate to: that bright but socially awkward programmer and the naïve entrepreneur with a lot to learn.

“Silicon Valley” seems like a winner so far, but the question is whether it can avoid falling prey to a lot of the common myths Hollywood likes to perpetuate about startup life.

Myth 1: A good idea automatically equals success.

When all you read about are the multibillion-dollar success stories, it’s easy to think that success is a sure thing if you have a good idea — or that good ideas are immediately rewarded with plentiful funding.

In reality, it’s not that simple. The venture capital world is complicated, and there’s a lot of competition to secure funding of any kind. A good idea needs a good plan, a good team, and a lot of luck. And even with all those things, failure is all too common.

Myth 2: Genius and social skills are mutually exclusive.

In shows like “The Big Bang Theory” bright, technology-obsessed characters are often stereotyped as socially awkward geeks. Or, as we saw in “The Social Network,” brilliance in Hollywood often translates to arrogance, self-importance, or standoffishness on-screen.

While there are plenty of antisocial geniuses, tech shows distort reality. Succeeding in Silicon Valley is not for wallflowers. By and large, entrepreneurs must be bright, motivated, and willing to listen and learn, as well as equipped with good social skills.

Myth 3: It’s easy to put together the perfect team.

Television shows often give the impression that it’s easy to pull together a highly skilled, highly compatible team right off the bat. But in the real world, there’s no casting call for the right skills and the right temperament. The perfect team isn’t just sitting around waiting for your breakthrough. The right people can be challenging to find and motivate to join the team. Your team’s chemistry relies on a combination of referrals, trial and error, and luck.

Shortly into its debut, “Silicon Valley” has done a good job of presenting a microcosm of the real Silicon Valley, especially for first-timers. And it’s popular for a reason: To those outside the startup bubble, it’s a fascinating world with a mysterious way of doing business. Anyone who has spent time in the tech industry will see where Judge gets it right, and anyone who hasn’t will find themselves more informed about the realities of Silicon Valley.

But the truth is that startup life is not particularly glamorous or mysterious. It’s not about fancy campuses or billion-dollar algorithms — it’s about bright, motivated people who work very hard every day to make an impact on the world.

 

Until next time,

Kelli Richards
CEO of The All Access Group, LLC

 

PS, The right mentor should also have the right CONNECTIONS to move you forward. Be sure to ask who they think they can bring to the table around advisorship, possible collaboration and even funding.

 

Originally posted: https://www.forbes.com/sites/85broads/2014/05/06/dear-hbo-please-keep-silicon-valley-real/

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